Performing Arts International (PAINARTS) is an international non-profit organization incorporated under Belgian law with the mission to support and encourage global mobility and international collaboration and communication in the arts. The organization was founded in 2004 and initiated initiatives ranging from curated events, prospection trips for programmers, tour management for artists, artistic exchange platforms, residency, facilitation, study days, publications and more. Since Fall, 2009, the organization reinvented itself as a service organization offering services to artists and arts organizations. Take a look at the ‘services’ post it for more information.In 2008 and 2009, Performing Arts International went to New York for the APAP conference and the Under the Radar festival. Services offered include: international sales and tour production specializing in transatlantic touring between Europe and the United States. International promotion: assisting in the promotion of an event or production across transnational lines. Prospection: Our people travel around and see quite a lot of work and based on the artistic profile you outline, we can see or recommended works to you. We also carry out several production aspects linked to working internationally including consultancy. Who we are: Walter Bouchez, general coordinator, holds a MA degree in performing arts studies specializing in international cultural policy and arts management. He has worked as a tour manager and international relations officer for a number of cultural institutions, artists and projects in Belgium, the Netherlands and the USA. Robin Jonsson works to support the work of a Swedish choreographer living and working in Brussels. His work focuses on the blurring notions of the virtual and the real. He is currently working on a new piece called Simulations, investigating virtual bodies in video games and other unreal media. You? Performing Arts International just relaunched and is eager to sit together with you. Let’s talk about our interests and maybe we are a match made in heaven! PAINARTS is based in Brussels, but can easily come pay you a visit anywhere in Europe. Also, in January 2010 we will be in New York and open to visiting with US artists during our visits. If you are interested in meeting with us we request you send us a prospectus regarding the nature of your artwork and interests in terms of promotion. What is art? Art can be much more than a rectangular box on the wall, or a piece of sculpture on a pedestal or even a chair lift for stairs. Since the early 20th century, art has continued to evolve in ways, many of whom cross the barriers of age or arbitrary labels and categories. The prominent art critic Clive Bell who argued in his work “Art” that it all begins with a well recognized understanding that all genuine works of art evoke an aesthetic emotion. However, Bell’s argument has been criticized as being too circular since it seems that its two main concepts, aesthetic emotion and significant form, are completely dependent and defined each in terms of the other. Another art critic, Collingwood, states in his “Principles of Art” that the actual work of art is non-physical. For Collingwood, art is an idea or emotion in the artist’s mind. But for others, the main objective property of art, and the distinction of good art, is its expression – which is “telling.” To achieve this communication, the artists need to create freely and challenge assumptions about art and about themselves and their audience. Traditional painting tried to be an illusion of reality – as if the viewer looked through a window to a space or the outside world. The techniques used to create this illusion of reality were perspective, foreshortening, shading to create three dimensions, and other spatial cues to give the illusion of spatial depth. In the 19th century, artists began to neglect the need for illusion, and by the early 20th century, started to create collages that made no pretense of three-dimensionality. Paradoxically, they were often more “realistic”.  In modern and contemporary art, the work can not be a “subject” in this sense, if abstract or nonobjective. And often, the work is about art itself – that is, it relates to other works of art of the past or present, or “subject” is the nature of art – what is art? What is perception? Content means that the meaning of the work is, and is often confusing. Also, most artists do not fit neatly into any categories of style. As artists grow and change, they move between areas of freestyle, as many musicians do. However, there are some characteristics of certain artistic movements, although some members may not have these features. For example, impressionism can be said to be about color and light, although the style of Degas is very different from Monet or a Renoir. Expressionism can be said to be about emotion and suffering, perhaps, in spite of varied styles between expressionist painters. Cubism was about space and composition, although there are various types – analytical, synthetic, and collage. Surrealism tend to be on the unconscious fantasy and dreams. Abstract Expressionists tended to deal with abstract images, spirit and emotion. Art today often comments on the art of others – like a conversation, with time. As musicians, artists influence each other greatly, so mutual, responding to them through the ages and places. Evaluating art is also quite complicated as one person’s art may be another trash. Art is by its very very nature quite subjective. As such, it is subject to the individual personality and nature of its creator. Thus no other person should ever claim the right to place a value judgment upon the art of another individual. Art needs to remain one of the last refuges of the individual. It should be jealously guarded against those kind of people or shows who would like to judge its worth on whatever grounds they deem important or necessary. PS3 Repair, for example, has nothing to do with art, for example. Expressing a like or dislike is fine and also very personal – but that is making a statement only about our personal preferences. Only the artist herself or himself who was the one who created the work and the meaning behind it can truly know if it is successful and met their expectations. For more, visit your local art gallery or enroll in an art appreciation course in your local college. Studying art abroad may be one of the best ways to truly appreciate the variety cross culturally of artistic expression. There are many different options if you are interested in studying art abroad. Everything from summer program to year long programs are available. There are also programs available at almost every level as well, from undergraduate to graduate level. During most study abroad art programs you will also have the option to do cultural immersion as well – such as living with a host family and doing language study. Some of the popular European locations for studying the arts abroad include Paris and Florence, but there are many different options to choose from. Visual-aesthetic education can be defined as the process whereby one learns how to produce art, engage in the aesthetic and critical analysis of art, and to talk, read and write about art. Although this definition is broad in scope, it does not begin to describe the concepts and activities involved in becoming visually and aesthetically literate. The process of learning has both form and content; form is concerned with how one learns and content pertains to what is actually learned. Students of art are often confronted with two basic questions they need to answer before embarking on any study program: What do I want to learn about art? What skills and knowledge do I want to acquire as a result of my efforts? In order to answer these questions, you must first be familiar with the ideas, images and practices associated with the visual arts. The varied facets of the subject need to be investigated in order to recognize which aspects would be most appropriate at particular times and for particular needs. Visual-aesthetic education can be defined as the process whereby one learns how to produce art, engage in the aesthetic and critical analysis of art, and to talk, read and write about art and aroha organics. Although this definition is broad in scope, it does not begin to describe the concepts and activities involved in becoming visually and aesthetically literate. The process of learning has both form and content. The first, form, is concerned with how one learns and content pertains to what is actually learned. Students of art are often confronted with two basic questions they need to answer before embarking on any study program: What do I want to learn about art? What skills and knowledge do I want to acquire as a result of my efforts?